FAQs

Q?

Do I need dental crowns?

A.

You may choose to use dental crowns

  • As a protective cover for badly decayed or fractured teeth,
  • As a permanent restoration for teeth with large fillings,
  • To correct minor problems in natural teeth (e.g. spacing, irregular shape, discolouration), or
  • If you have had root canal treatment, especially at the posterior teeth.

Q?

What are the various types of tooth fillings?

A.

  1. Simple dental fillings would refer to amalgam—a silver-coloured filling used for cavities. They are a mix of metals such as mercury, silver, copper and tin. The materials we have chosen are of great quality, which contributes to the durability and allows us to withstand chewing forces.
  2. Composite fillings — a tooth-coloured filling which looks and feels natural to the patient. However, composites tend to wear out sooner than silver fillings in larger cavities, although they hold up as well in small cavities.
  3. Porcelain fillings — also a tooth-coloured filling which generally look better and often last longer than silver fillings.

 

Q?

What are the symptoms for Periodontal (gum) disease?

A.

  • Red, swollen, puffy-looking or tender gums
  • Pus secretion from between the teeth and gums
  • Shaky teeth
  • Teeth appearing to drift apart from its original position
  • Receding gum line (gum recession)
  • Persistent bad breath
  • Discomfort or dull-ache of gums and teeth

Q?

How long does teeth whitening last?

A.

There are many factors that can affect the shade of your teeth after whitening. Depending on factors like original shade and staining, it may take a longer period of time to get that ideal smile. Certain foods, smoking and medications can cause staining even after your teeth are whitened. You may want to use a whitening toothpaste or the opalescence home kit for a couple of nights, and returning for touch-up treatments once or twice a year to retain your desired shade.

Bleaching should only be done under a dentist’s care. Patients should not consider any other options as the lack of comprehensive professional dental diagnosis and management can cause unintended results. With little scientific knowledge, patients may put their teeth through unwanted potential risks.

Q?

Is teeth whitening safe?

A.

This procedure is generally safe for patients. While most people experience little or no side effects, some might experience transient sensitivity or gum irritation through chemical burns (if any).

Q?

How effective is teeth whitening?

A.

Bleaching is effective in lightening most stains caused by age, tobacco, coffee, and tea. Based on clinical studies, 96 per cent of patients enjoy a lighter shade after whitening. Other types of stains, such as those produced by antibiotic (tetracycline) usage or fluorosis (too much fluoride), makes predictability of results more difficult.

Q?

Am I suitable for teeth whitening (teeth bleaching)?

A.

External bleaching is not for everyone. Generally, you’re not suitable for this procedure if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Children under the age of 16 are also not recommended for bleaching as the pulp chamber or nerve of the tooth is enlarged at this age and use of whitening solutions can irritate the pulp or cause it to become sensitive.

If you are a frequent consumer of foods or drinks (e.g. tea, coffee, wine, carbonated drinks) that have a high probability of staining, a smoker, have pre-existing teeth sensitivity, many cavities, tetracycline stained teeth or root canal treatment in any of your tooth’s, an assessment would be required to ascertain your suitability for bleaching.

Please also note that dental crowns, veneers and composite (white) fillings do not lighten with peroxide.

Q?

What to avoid after removing your wisdom tooth?

A.

For 24 hours after removing your wisdom tooth, you should avoid:

  • Rinsing your mouth out with liquid
  • Drinking alcohol and smoking
  • Drinking hot liquids such as tea or soup
  • Strenuous physical activities

Q?

How successful is orthodontic treatment?

A.

The success of orthodontic treatment depends on the operator and the patient.

For removable appliances, it is important that the wearer comply to the number of hours of wearing time. As for metal brackets, it is required for the patient to clean his/her teeth well during treatment as there are increased chances of residual food and plaque formation due to the metal surfaces. If not, caries, also known as tooth decay, may form easily.

For most, orthodontic treatment is an elective procedure. There are alternative solutions to orthodontic problems such as prosthodontic treatments using veneers and/or crowns to align the teeth.  The risks and benefits of each alternative can be better comprehended through discussions with your orthodontist.